Copyright © 1964-2024 Tripoli Pittsburgh, Tripoli Rocketry Association, Inc.
TRIPOLI Pittsburgh
Launch Report
June 16, 2024
Page 10
Flyers: 17
Flights: 43

It can be hard not to feature John Haught as he tends to do the things that get featured. It was John and Kevin Wuchevich that declared "Cluster June" and John came ready to prove it.
John Haught
Kevin and John haul the jumbo Holy Cow out to the high power pads.
John fixes the igniter wires on his Holy Cow before launch.
 
"Let's see.... this one goes here and that one goes there.... yeah... that's it.", mutters John as he wires up the mighty Cow motors.
 
A central L motor surrounded by no less than six G motors brought the Cow into the M motor class.
 
Note the wiring in the photo below.
After flying his Wild Thang John bring out this great looking upscale of the classic Estes Sprint.
 
The Sprint was loaded with a trio of H motors.
The Sprint reconfigures itself on the launch pad.
The TRIPOLI Pittsburgh resident photographer reminds us why we should take plenty of photos of any rocket before loading it up and pressing the button.
 
Sometimes it won't look quite the same afterwards.
 
John takes it all in stride and loads up more rockets for flight. Hang in there John!
"That wasn't supposed to happen.", says John as one of the motors shoots off to the west.
John Haught in the pits with his Hot Sauce saucer/bottle type rocket.
 
 
Kevin and John haul the jumbo Holy Cow out to the high power pads.
John fixes the igniter wires on his Holy Cow before launch.
 
"Let's see.... this one goes here and that one goes there.... yeah... that's it.", mutters John as he wires up the mighty Cow motors.
 
A central L motor surrounded by no less than six G motors brought the Cow into the M motor class.
 
Note the wiring in the photo below.
The Hot Sauce heads to the southeast off of the pad. If not for the high drag design, the Sauce would have ended up in the trees.
 
 
Despite heading for the eastern forest, the Hot Sauce burns out and ejects its parachute early enough to land within the infield for an easy recovery.
 
 
John had more tricks up his sleeve to be revealed. After the Sprint incedent he brought out the big Holy Cow to show how cluster rockets can truly be done.
 
 
While it would appear as if one of the G motors did not ignite, John later confirmed that all of the motors lit.
After reaching an altitude of 3,684' the Holy Cow began its descent.
 
A perfect parachute deployment did not keep the Cow from ending up in the western forest towards the river.
 
Numerous drone flights and trips down the hill were required with the end result being a safe and relatively easy recovery.
 
"The Holy Cow will fly again!" exclaimed John.
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